Review: Masalchi street food restaurant in Wembley Park

Atol Kochlar in the kitchen at Masalchi in Wembley Park

Atol Kochlar in the kitchen at Masalchi in Wembley Park - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

Standing proud next to Wembley's iconic football stadium is a new restaurant serving dishes of tantalising Indian street food. 

Masalchi, by celebrity chef Atul Kochlar, is a journey through India that starts at Wembley Park Boulevard.

Step in to this open plan space with its mood lighting from overhead market lamps and wait to be seated by one of the students the restaurant has taken on as staff.

The menu is full  - full of small plates, grills, plenty of tantalising bites to whet the appetite.

Chicken 65 at Masalchi

Chicken 65 at Masalchi - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

My companion and I were given the Spice Masters Menu which was really lucky because I couldn't choose.

All the dishes came from different regions of India and you could taste it. 

We started with the universal Indian experience of poppadom's with a tomato sauce that needed more kick and a mango chutney that was meaty, chunky and tasty.

The dishes arrived crisp chicken tossed with curry leaves and chilli was tender and warming but not so hot to make a child weep.

Aloo Kachori, a bread and potato curry at Masalchi

Aloo Kachori, a bread and potato curry at Masalchi - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

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The Aloo Kachori on the other hand was a dense, fragrant bread and potato curry from the Agra & Mathura areas of India that takes your imagination straight to a busy market for a lunch time snack.

A family recipe of lamb seekh kebab - Miyaji Sheekwale - came with a parsley sauce and loaded with flavour.

Miyaji Sheekwale, family recipe of lamb seekh kebab from Lucknowi household at Masalchi

Miyaji Sheekwale, family recipe of lamb seekh kebab from Lucknowi household at Masalchi - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

Personal standout dishes included the Machhi Masala, a plump, silky fish in a South Indian spiced sauce that was light and full of seasoning.

Mutton Keema Aloo, from the royal Lucknow region was a fiery combination of ground mutton and potatoes while the Chicken Makhan Palak was a moreish butter chicken with spinach.

There was a side serving of pilau rice, naan bread and a very comforting Peeli Daal.

Chicken Makhan Palak - classic butter chicken with spinach

Chicken Makhan Palak - classic butter chicken with spinach - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

These simply flavourful plates were inspired by Atul Kochhar’s back-street travels around provincial markets.

He named his restaurant after the spice master, the person in the kitchen who is in charge of spices and in all his dishes the spices were delicately blended.

Dessert was Gulab Jamun -  hot cheese dumplings in a rose syrup which had the texture of a sponge pudding.

We washed these down with non alcoholic berry cocktails that doubled up as a palate cleanser.

A ginger and cardamon tea, so warm and subtle, was offered at the end, as a digestif and a perfect finish to the devoured feast.

Machhi Masala, fish in South Indian spiced sauce

Machhi Masala, fish in South Indian spiced sauce - Credit: Nathalie Raffray

Atol Kochlar said: "I want to feed a lot, a lot of people amazing food and please people every day."

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