US military air strike in Syria ‘kills’ Queen’s Park terrorist Mohammed Emwazi

Emwazi always appeared in videos dressed in black with his face covered (Photo: Liveleak/PA Wire)

Emwazi always appeared in videos dressed in black with his face covered (Photo: Liveleak/PA Wire) - Credit: Archant

The British terrorist from Queen’s Park Mohammed Emwazi has been killed in an air strike by US military, according to reports.

Mohammed Emwazi is known as 'Jihadi John'

Mohammed Emwazi is known as 'Jihadi John' - Credit: Archant

Sources close to the Islamic State (IS) stronghold of Raqqa in Syria said the terrorist was targeted by a drone during the operation last night. The Pentagon said it was assessing the information.

Emwazi, who grew up on the Mozart Estate in Queen’s Park, is believed to be responsible for the deaths of several IS hostages, including Britons Alan Henning and David Haines.

Emwazi, a former student at the University of Westminster, came to notoriety in a video in August 2014 which showed the beheading of US journalist James Foley.

He also appeared in videos showing the killings of Mr Henning and Mr Haines, American journalist Steven Sotloff, aid worker Abdul-Rahman Kassig and Japanese journalists Kenji Goto and Haruna Yukawa shortly before they were killed.

Mohammed Emwazi grew up on the Mozart Estate

Mohammed Emwazi grew up on the Mozart Estate - Credit: PA Wire/Press Association Images


You may also want to watch:


Last night’s operation is being investigated by the Intelligence and Security Committee (ISC) which oversees the work of MI5, MI6 and GCHQ, after concerns were raised about its legal basis.

Rami Abdel Rahman, director of the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights, said the drone strike “killed the British leader of Isis last night”.

Most Read

He said sources in Raqqa confirmed the death, but that they were uncertain of the man’s identity at present.

Prime minister David Cameron said it had not yet been confirmed that Emwazi - who he branded a “barbaric murderer” - was dead.

But he said Britain had been working “hand in glove” round the clock with its closest ally the US to track down and target the militant, who is believed to be responsible for the deaths of several IS hostages, including Britons Alan Henning and David Haines.

In a statement outside 10 Downing Street, the Prime Minister said that Emwazi had remained a threat to innocent people, including in the UK.

And he said: “This was an act of self defence. It was the right thing to do.”

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter