Stiff sentence for student who sold unlicensed impotence drugs

Court hears medication was worth �50,000 on the black market

A student who sold unlicensed impotence drugs and counterfeit labels and buttons for use on fake designer clothing has been sent to prison.

Harrow Crown Court heard 24-year-old Daanish Mulla ran a counterfeit racket selling tablets and sachets to treat impotence which was worth up to �50,000 on the black market.

The overseas student was also found in possession of more than 2,000 counterfeit labels bearing the G-Star name and buttons which could have been used to make fake clothing bearing the designer name.

Mulla was snared after Brent and Harrow Trading Standards Service (BHTSS) received a tip-off from HM Revenue and Customs that counterfeit goods were being shipped to an address in Dollis Hill Lane, Dollis Hill.


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A raid of the address led BHTSS officers to an address in Harrow were Mulla lived.

He denied any wrong doing claiming he was unaware of the fake clothing accessories.

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Despite forensic analysis showing his computer contained spreadsheets with the names and addresses of customers who bought the unlicensed medication, Mulla claimed he was working on behalf of a man called ‘Sunny’ and had no direct contact with buyers or their money.

Tests by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) on the seized medication showed that the drugs were predominantly made up of unlicensed erectile dysfunction pharmaceuticals.

Last week, Mulla was he was convicted of a number of offences under the Trade Marks Act and jailed for four months.

Bill Billon from BHTSS said: “I am very pleased we have disrupted this operation that potently was supplying other criminals with labels and buttons used to manufacturer fake goods and prevented medicines from being supplied in what would have been a totally uncontrolled manner.

“The whole reason these drugs have to be authorised and licensed is because they can pose significant risk to public health if supplied to users without proper medical supervision.”

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