Sharing spoils from gardens

GREEN-FINGERED campaigners are leading a drive to find disused gardens to be used as communal allotments for residents. The scheme allows people who do not have the time to look after their own gardens to let others use their land to grow fruit and veget

GREEN-FINGERED campaigners are leading a drive to find disused gardens to be used as communal allotments for residents.

The scheme allows people who do not have the time to look after their own gardens to let others use their land to grow fruit and vegetables.

The produce grown is then shared between the gardeners and the home owners.

Transition Kensal to Kilburn, which campaigns on sustainable living, launched the scheme in January after finding out that Brent had no allotments in the immediate area, and that those which did exist in the north of the borough had long waiting lists.


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Six residents have so far donated their gardens to the scheme, but campaigners are keen to recruit more.

Michael Stuart, of Christchurch Avenue, Kilburn, has been involved in setting up the scheme. He said: "We want to match people who want to grow food but don't have access to land with people with access to land who don't have time to take care of it."

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Readers who are interested in joining the scheme, either by lending their garden or volunteering to work on a garden, should contact Michael Stuart on Michael.stuart6@ googlemail.com.

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