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Campaigners hold a protest against multi-storey high rise plans in Cricklewood

PUBLISHED: 12:14 16 June 2020 | UPDATED: 12:37 16 June 2020

Locals protest against planned high rises in Cricklewood. Picture: Cricklewood Action Group

Locals protest against planned high rises in Cricklewood. Picture: Cricklewood Action Group

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Campaigners against planned high rises in Cricklewood staged an “awareness raising” protest so people could “know what’s coming”.

Barnet resident Nicholas plays his violin during Cricklewood protest against high rises. Picture: Cricklewood Action GroupBarnet resident Nicholas plays his violin during Cricklewood protest against high rises. Picture: Cricklewood Action Group

Private property developer Montreaux is to lodge an application with Barnet Council to build a 25-storey tower and smaller 16 and 14-storey high rises in the B&Q car park site.

The regeneration plans include new homes, commercial spaces and “a town square” with “places for children to play”.

Protesters from the Cricklewood Action Group (CAG), which incorporates locals from Barnet, Camden and Brent, gathered at the same site in Cricklewood Green on Saturday (June 13) to “raise public consciousness” of the “overbearing scheme proposals”.

Key concerns are the height of the buildings which they would like to see reduced to nine storeys, the overshadowing of nearby properties, and increased pressure on services affecting the three boroughs.

Locals protest against planned high rises in Cricklewood. Picture: Cricklewood Action GroupLocals protest against planned high rises in Cricklewood. Picture: Cricklewood Action Group

Sapna Chadha, co-ordinator of CAG, who lives in Blenheim Gardens, said: “If these tower block heights are approved when plans are submitted to Barnet council this will set a precedent for more tall tower developments out of character with the heights of buildings locally and the Edwardian architecture.”

Nicholas Berezovsky, 17, who played the violin, said: “Cricklewood really needs something for young people as there is nothing for us to do.”

Janet Crawford, of Elm Grove, said: “This level of over-development can only be about money and is out of all proportion to what the area needs. The tower block would stick out like a sore thumb and cast a long shadow over the neighbourhood, whilst the additional occupants would put a huge strain on local services and transport.”

Montreaux said it would provide a financial contribution to Barnet Council to “help support these services”.

A spokesperson added: “We understand concerns about the impact the proposed development might have on the local area and have been working hard to minimise or mitigate those concerns, particularly in relation to daylight and sunlight, and local views.”

A Barnet Council spokesperson said: “All comments received during consultation are taken into account as part of the decision making process.”


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