Kingsbury: road plan saves lives

A road safety scheme is saving lives and cut accidents by two thirds, figures have shown. The scheme was introduced in Kingsbury last year, while the Lib Dems were running Brent Town Hall, and cut personal injury accidents from an average of six to two a

A road safety scheme is saving lives and cut accidents by two thirds, figures have shown.

The scheme was introduced in Kingsbury last year, while the Lib Dems were running Brent Town Hall, and cut personal injury accidents from an average of six to two a year.

The traffic calming measure, opposed by the Labour Party, includes white lines and three new islands in Kingsbury Road.

Cllr Paul Lorber, Lib-Dem opposition leader, said: "It's all too easy for politicians to start jumping on a short-term bandwagon and shouting about in advance of an election.


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"What's harder is to take decisions that may be unpopular at the time but which serve to end the tragic loss of life on our roads, and reduce the risk of serious accidents.

"Having already splashed out about �5,000 to stay at a plush Hotel in Buckinghamshire to plan their budget cuts, I hope Labour bosses will now save the �5,000 cost of a review and instead welcome the success of this scheme and its clear safety benefits."

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The Labour Party criticised the scheme mainly because the residents had not been fully consulted and pledged to review the results a year later.

In 2009 Cllr Jim Moher, Brent Highways and Transportation boss, said: "This is another example of Big Brother Brent Council forcing their 'we know best' views on the public. We pledge to remove these road narrowing lines at the first chance."

This week Cllr Moher said: "The main incidents or accidents are around the Roe Green Park. We will review the scheme next spring but the last time we looked there was no change. We felt it would have been designed better if the main residents concerned were consulted."

He complained about the huge queues in the Kingsbury Road during the rush hour.

The key problem was that they only consulted a small number of residents and those using the road all the time were not consulted.

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