Killer’s bid for freedom

A SCHIZOPHRENIC killer is making a bid for freedom just two years after he was locked up for stabbing a man to death, the Times can reveal. The daughter of Gerry Fairall has expressed her dismay after discovering that Cecil Walcott, 54, of Tollgate Gard

A SCHIZOPHRENIC killer is making a bid for freedom just two years after he was locked up for stabbing a man to death, the Times can reveal.

The daughter of Gerry Fairall has expressed her dismay after discovering that Cecil Walcott, 54, of Tollgate Gardens, Kilburn, is up for release so soon after her father's killing.

Mr Fairall, a father-of-four from Kilburn, died after Walcott plunged a knife into him in the Red Lion Pub on Kilburn High Road, in November 2006.

Walcott, who has a history of violence which includes a knife attack on a woman in 1985, and an assault on a police officer in 1975, was convicted of Mr Fairall's manslaughter and was detained indefinitely under the Mental Health Act in January 2008.


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He was also found guilty of the attempted murder of 44-year-old Simon Watkins who he knifed in the chest and slashed across the face.

Tanya Buransky-Stanford told the Times that under no circumstances should Walcott be released and she fears he will kill again if he is let back on to the streets permanently.

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She said: "When the judge said he would be detained indefinitely I thought that meant for life.

"It's all so wrong. How can someone kill someone and be out in two years."

As part of his sentence, Walcott was ordered to undergo treatment for his schizophrenia, a ruling that Mrs Buransky-Stanford fears could be the key to his freedom.

She said: "The authorities have told my family that his schizophrenia is under control so he is fine to go out into the community.

"He is currently in a controlled environment and has people giving him his medication but once he is released anything could happen.

"He could stop taking his medication and do the same to another stranger and ruin another family's life.

"I really don't think he's well enough to be let out."

In a further twist, Mrs Buransky-Stanford said she discovered Walcott was being allowed to make unsupervised visits to his family and friends in and around Brent.

She said: "We were never informed of this and neither were the police who stopped it immediately when they found out.

"I cannot begin to imagine how we would have felt to pass him on the street.

"Schizophrenia is a lifelong illness and needs to be managed and he needs to be punished for his crimes.

"If he stops taking his medication he could attack again and if he did I would feel incredibly guilty if we can't do anything about this now."

In the meantime Mrs Buransky-Stanford and her family are writing a family statement against the release of Walcott that will be read out during his tribunal hearing which is due to take place on April 24.

She said: "My family will oppose this but there is a very strong chance he will be released soon.

"When my dad died it was a very traumatic time for us all.

"He (Walcott) took away my father and my children lost their grandfather. It sent shockwaves through our family and friend's lives.

"To think he could be freed is causing us all a great deal of distress and trauma once again.

"Not only do we feel let down by the mental health system that will sanction the release of a man who took my fathers life after being sectioned for only two years, but we are also mortified that such a dangerous man could possibly be released back into 'care in the community' that failed him previously.

"While we have all tried our hardest to rebuild our lives and put our family's tragedy at rest we simply cannot rest and let this man walk free."

A spokesman for the Parole Board said once a prisoner had served a minimum tariff on his or her sentences they are entitled to go in from of a parole board.

He added: "The statutory test to be applied by the Parole Board is whether it is satisfied that the risk to life and limb to the public is no more than minimal. If it is so satisfied, it is required to release or re-release the prisoner.

"When making their judgement the board will take into account the nature of the index offence, the prisoner's offending history, the prisoner's progress in prison, any statement made on behalf of the victim(s), psychologist's reports, probation officer's reports, prisons officer's reports, any statistical risk assessments that have been completed and the view of the Secretary of State.

"There must also be a comprehensive resettlement plan in place.

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