HS2 could scupper plans for Willesden Junction incinerator

High speed rail line from London to Birmingham may need the site

A planning application to build a giant incinerator in the Willesden Junction area could be under threat after rail bosses confirmed they are looking to use the site for the government’s controversial High Speed 2 (HS2) scheme.

The application, made by Clean Power Properties, which has attracted widespread criticism, would see an ‘energy recovery centre’ built in the area’s industrial park.

It would have four 25m high chimneys spouting out burnt waste and two tanks for decomposing food.

It is due to go to Ealing’s planning committee next week.


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However, the Times can confirm that HS2, a high speed rail line from London to Birmingham, are also lining up a bid for the site, which could render the incinerator plans redundant.

HS2 want to use the site to transport waste and rubbish, via rail, from the construction of tunnels in the nearby area.

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Any area that HS2 use for their construction can be ‘safeguarded’ meaning no developments would be allowed to take place without consultation to HS2.

An Hs2 spokesman said confirmed they were looking to use the site and will be in touch with Ealing Council to inform them.

He added that they would also be looking to safeguard the area.

The incinerator plans have been condemned by numerous local residents in the Harlesden and Willesden areas who fear the impact it may have on the air quality.

Brent Council have also submitted an objection to the plans.

Ealing Council have been contacted for comment but have not responded.

Peter Fry, HS2 Ltd community and stakeholder manager for London said: “We have identified potential sites in Ealing to be used for the construction of the UK’s high speed rail network.

“The site at the end of Channel Gate Road is an important part of our current plans which we want to use to remove excavated material from the tunnels.”

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