Search

Willesden Green grandmother to skydive for innovative cancer care treatment

PUBLISHED: 10:01 05 June 2017 | UPDATED: 10:01 05 June 2017

Lucy, Jane and Claire Scott last Christmas.

Lucy, Jane and Claire Scott last Christmas.

Archant

The 66-year-old hopes to raise money for the latest cancer research and treatment at The Royal Marsden Cancer Charity, which has given the finest care to her daughter.

Jane Scott, from Willesden Green, is jumping in support of her daughter Lucy who is receiving immunotherapy.

Her older daughter, Claire, 44, who is very close to Lucy, 40, will be skydiving with her this month.

The family hope to raise money for the charity to carry out more research, as immunotherapy is emerging as such an effective treatment.

Lucy Davis, née Scott, who grew up in Hampstead, was diagnosed with melanoma in 2011 after her husband found a mole on her back.

After initial treatment, her cancer returned.

Following a stage four diagnosis in 2013, where she was told she might only have a few months, Lucy decided to take part in a clinical trial at The Royal Marsden.

The treatment, a combination of immunotherapy drugs Ipilumab and Nivolumab, was very successful, and within weeks her tumours had shrunk “enormously”.

Her tumours unfortunately started to grow last Christmas, and she is again receiving immunotherapy, but she believes the treatment has given her years.

In the last four years, she has watched her 11 and nine year old sons grow up.

She believes patients must have more say on accessing clinical drugs, as they might be prepared to take risks that their carers might not.

While new drugs might be very expensive for the NHS, they have the potential to add years to people’s lives if they respond well.

Jane believes that they are especially important for cancers such as melanoma, where chemotherapy does not appear to be effective.

Jane said: “What we’ve learnt is that actually the difficulty is knowing who to see, getting the information and access to drugs. We all get very anxious and worry about the side effects, and Lucy just says it’s different, I will take risks because of my prognosis that other people might not.

“Patients need information about trials and more access to them and they need to be able to get on drugs faster when it becomes obvious that these trials are working.”

To donate to the skydive on June 10, visit: justgiving.com/fundraising/JaneandClaire5173?utm_id=13

Most Read

Latest from the Kilburn Times

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists