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Harlesden man believed to be a jihadist fighter for ISIS in Syria could face UK ban

PUBLISHED: 13:21 26 August 2014 | UPDATED: 16:44 26 August 2014

This pic of of Aine Davis was recovered from his wife's mobile phone

This pic of of Aine Davis was recovered from his wife's mobile phone

Archant

A Harlesden man believed to be a jihadist fighter for ISIS in Syria could face a UK ban if the government bring in new laws tackle British extremists.

This picture of Aine Davis with other suspect fighters was found on his wife's mobile phoneThis picture of Aine Davis with other suspect fighters was found on his wife's mobile phone

Aine Davis, 30, of Rucklidge Avenue, became a terrorist suspect after he flew out to Syria last July.

Theresa May, the Home Secretary, announced she may introduce new laws to tackle British extremists in the wake of the killing of US journalist James Foley by a jihadist with an English accent.

She said she needed to introduce all the legal powers necessary to win the struggle against terror that is feared to last for decades.

Banning orders for extremist groups will be looked at again alongside powers to stop radical preachers.

Amal El-Wahabi is facing a prison sentence (Pic credit: Central News)Amal El-Wahabi is facing a prison sentence (Pic credit: Central News)

She also underlined changes to the law that means naturalised Britons who are fighting overseas can be stripped of their citizenship and excluded.

Earlier this month Davis’ 27-year-old wife Amal El-Wahabi was found guilty of making money available with “reasonable cause to suspect that it would or may be used for the purposes of terrorism”.

The mother-of-two recruited her friend Nawal Msaad to smuggle 20,000 Euros in her knickers on a flight to Turkey where it would be sent on to her husband, who uses the Muslim name Hamza.

She is the first Briton to be convicted under terror laws of funding jihadist fighters in Syria and will be setenced on September 12.

Home Secretary Theresa MayHome Secretary Theresa May

Msaad was acquitted in court.

In an article for the Daily Telegraph, Ms May said: “We will be engaged in this struggle for many years, probably decades. We must give ourselves all the legal powers we need to prevail.

“I am looking again at the case for new banning orders for extremist groups that fall short of the legal threshold for terrorist proscription, as well as for new civil powers to target extremists who seek to radicalise others.

“For those who have dual nationality, I have the power to strip them of their citizenship and exclude them from the country.

“Following the recent Immigration Act, I can, in certain circumstances, remove citizenship from naturalised Britons who are fighting overseas and exclude them too.

“And while it is illegal for any country to make its citizens stateless, any British national who returns from Syria and Iraq faces prosecution here for participating in terrorist activities abroad.”

Since the coalition came to power in 2010 more than 150 people have been excluded from Britain for “unacceptable behaviour”, including foreign hate preachers.

Police have also secured the removal of 28,000 pieces of terrorist material from the internet.


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