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Brent primary students stage climate march

PUBLISHED: 14:16 17 February 2020

Around 35 pupils from Roe Green Junior School marched to Kingsbury high street on Friday, February 14. Pictures: Jay Burgess

Around 35 pupils from Roe Green Junior School marched to Kingsbury high street on Friday, February 14. Pictures: Jay Burgess

Jay Burgess

Students from a Brent primary school staged a climate change march in their high street to spread awareness to neighbours and local businesses.

Making yourself heard. Pictures: Jay BurgessMaking yourself heard. Pictures: Jay Burgess

Around 35 pupils from Roe Green Junior School walked from their school to Kingsbury high street on Friday, February 14.

Valentines Day was chosen as the children wanted to express their "love for the Earth".

Accompanied by staff, the students chanted "pollution has to go" and "plastic is a no". Handmade signs built of school rulers, duct tape and cardboard carried messages including "Save our planet - it's the only one that we have", "There is no Planet B" and "The Earth is dying - and so are we".

The group stopped outside Nationwide Building Society in Kingsbury Road to speak, sing and rap while shoppers stopped and listened, welcoming the passion the children clearly felt.

'There is no Planet B'. Picture: Jay Burgess'There is no Planet B'. Picture: Jay Burgess

The schools' 16 student councillors devised the idea for the march themselves. Palaash, a school councillor in year 3, said his motivation was to stop the use of plastic and reduce climate change.

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He said: "It makes me feel disappointed that people are doing this to our world. I'm feeling happy to learn about it so that we know what we can do."

Headteacher Melissa Loosemore believes climate change awareness is growing amongst pupils, and said she makes sure the school offers opportunities for children to be active in the movement.

'The Earth is dying and so are we'. Pictrue: Jay Burgess'The Earth is dying and so are we'. Pictrue: Jay Burgess

Young international activist Greta Thunberg became the school's "granddaughter", and broadcasting legend David Attenborough its "grandfather".

She said plastic found in fish and sea birds has "fired them up" most.

"They're very passionate. Young people - they've got the power", she said.

The children have been learning about climate change nearly every day, as it is their topic of focus for the year.

Taking to the high street. Picture: Jay BurgessTaking to the high street. Picture: Jay Burgess

One initiative, Wasteless Wednesdays, sees the class which uses the least amount of single-use plastic each week rewarded with extra break time.

In July, there will be a climate-related performance and showcase for parents to attend.


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