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Harlesden’s steel pan players leave instruments aside to take part in the Great British September Clean

PUBLISHED: 12:48 21 September 2020 | UPDATED: 15:48 21 September 2020

Young people of Phoenix Rising/St Michael & All Angels Steel Orchestra put instruments aside to litter pick. Picture: Patrick McKay

Young people of Phoenix Rising/St Michael & All Angels Steel Orchestra put instruments aside to litter pick. Picture: Patrick McKay

Archant

Young musicians from Harlesden’s award winning steel orchestra put their steel pans aside to do a community litter pick.

Young people of Phoenix Rising/St Michael and All Angels Steel Orchestra (SMAA) were out before 8am last weekend armed with litter picks and bags.

The clean up was part of the Great British September Clean.

However, Pheonix Rising’s chief Patrick McKay said they hope to continue doing regular clean up activities in Harlesden and Stonebridge to “demonstrate love and pride” in the community and encourage others to join in.

Patrick, Pheonix Rising’s trustee, said: “With support from Ashley Cumberbatch in Brent Environmental Services and Abi Ravichanthiran from Veolia UK, who provided gloves, litter pickers and bags, we were able to take an active part in the Great British September Clean.

“With two teams of five, the epicenter of our efforts was the area by the Fawood Childrens Center in Stonebridge. From here we cleared the litter, old Christmas trees and countless bottles and cans.

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“The participating young people cleared the grounds surrounding the Fawood Childrens Centre, The Avenue NW10 and a section of Wood Road NW10 of all the litter they could find.

“The group started at 8am and did great work.”

Patrick leads the SMAA, which has won numerous awards at the annual Notting Hill Carnival and can also be heard performing in Stonebridge and Harlesden most weekends.

But additionally, Patrick has launched an environmental social action project, Waterways and Trees, to teach participants about the canals and waterways that pass through the area.

He hopes to work with the council to develop a community orchard and herb garden near a Brent waterway.

“Our intention is to demonstrate our love and pride in our community and encourage others to get involved and do the same through our example,” he said.

“Young people learn and develop knowledge, skills and an understanding of the waterways’ history and value, so that through them, this resource and surrounding areas can be better accessed and used by all sections of the community.”


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