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Anti-pollution measures could prevent 33,008 hospital admissions in Brent by 2050, says report.

PUBLISHED: 08:22 28 February 2020 | UPDATED: 10:48 01 March 2020

Looking down the North Circular from Brent Cross towards Neasden. Two of its junctions - at Chartley Avenue and Drury Way - are among those with the most toxic air in Britain. Picture: Elliott Brown/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Looking down the North Circular from Brent Cross towards Neasden. Two of its junctions - at Chartley Avenue and Drury Way - are among those with the most toxic air in Britain. Picture: Elliott Brown/Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

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City Hall measures to tackle toxic air could prevent 33,008 hospital admissions in Brent by 2050, according to a new report.

The study carried out by Health Lumen, which estimates the long-term health benefits of clamping down on polluted air in London, suggests that in Brent, £131,760,764 in costs to the NHS and social care services could be avoided over the next 30 years.

The Ultra Low Emission Zone (ULEZ) was first introduced in central London in April 2019 and will be extended to the North and South Circulars from Autumn next year.

As reported in this paper in April last year, Brent has some of the worst pollution breaches across the UK.

Pollution hotspots include the North Circular, Ikea in Drury Lane, Neasden Lane and Chamberlayne Road.

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London Assembly Member for Brent and Harrow Navin Shah has welcomed the figures and is calling on the government to deliver further powers to the capital to tackle toxic air.

He said: "Air pollution contributes to the premature deaths of almost 10,000 Londoners each year, damages our children's lung development and for those routinely exposed to it, increases the chances of dementia and heart disease.

"This is a public health emergency which disproportionately affects the poorest communities, so it is incredibly positive to get a glimpse of the far-reaching and transformative impact that City Hall's environmental policies will have over the next 30 years.

"Bold policies such as the ULEZ, will help to prevent thousands of hospitalisations in our community and take a significant amount of strain off our already overstretched NHS and social care services."

The mayor's budget for 2020/2021, which has been passed by the London Assembly and supported by Mr Shah, has committed £50 million to a Green New Deal for London to accelerate the capital's transition to a carbon-neutral economy.

"We cannot afford to rest on our laurels and it remains the case that much more could be achieved if the Government devolved more funding and powers to City Hall to expand upon its work in cleaning up the capital's air." said Mr Shah.


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