Pupils from a Cricklewood primary school celebrate Roald Dahl’s 100th birthday

Pupils with teacher Gary Bradfield celebrate Roald Dahl's 100th anniversary with an authentic Willy

Pupils with teacher Gary Bradfield celebrate Roald Dahl's 100th anniversary with an authentic Willy Wonka Golden Ticket Pic credit: Polly Hancock - Credit: Archant

It was a Golden Ticket event for young Willy Wonkas in Cricklewood who dressed up as their favourite characters to celebrate an iconic author’s forthcoming 100th birthday.

Adam, four, with teacher Gary Bradfield and the Willy Wonka Golden Ticket at Anson Primary School's

Adam, four, with teacher Gary Bradfield and the Willy Wonka Golden Ticket at Anson Primary School's Roald Dahl celebrations Pic credit: Polly Hancock - Credit: Archant

Pupils and staff at Anson Primary School in Anson Road, celebrated the life and works of Roald Dahl in their own style with the original Golden Ticket from the 1971 film Willy Wonka and The Chocolate Factory.

The Golden Ticket, brought to the school by Avantis Education, featured in a lively Roald Dahl Assembly as part of a commemorative day to mark the author’s centenary year.

Throughout the day pupils enjoyed Dahl themed lessons, culminating in the school’s largest ever film club in which 123 pupils gathered to watch the iconic film.

The school is a member of Into Film, a UK-wide education organisation supported by the BFI with Lottery funding.


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Assistant head teacher Simon Pile first set up a film club over five years ago and has since embedded film as a teaching tool right across the curriculum, using free films and resources provided by Into Film, to boost literacy, motivate students and raise attainment.

In March he received the organisation’s Teacher of the Year Award for his innovative use of film in class.

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He said: “This is a special year as we begin our celebrations for the 100th birthday of Roald Dahl. With the visit of the Golden Ticket, from the 1971 film Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, we were able to give the children an exciting start to the celebrations.

“Our staff entered into the spirit of the occasion and brought the books to life.

“Using the resources from Into Film we could study how these stories are brought to life on film. We’ve got children studying individual scenes, the behaviour of characters, pivotal moments and they’ve invented their own machines, structures and stories. “Without doubt, more children now want to watch Roald Dahl films and importantly many more children want to read the original stories.”

Mr Dahl, who died in 1990, would have turned 100 this September.

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