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GCSE Results 2017: Queens Park Community School top national grade 9 proportions

PUBLISHED: 16:15 24 August 2017 | UPDATED: 09:34 25 August 2017

Mr Lemma, maths faculty leader, Zoja Wojcik (Three Grade 9s, six A*s and three As), Ayushi Khetani (Grade 9 and two Grade 8s, five A*s and three As)Ms Springer, English deputy faculty leader

Mr Lemma, maths faculty leader, Zoja Wojcik (Three Grade 9s, six A*s and three As), Ayushi Khetani (Grade 9 and two Grade 8s, five A*s and three As)Ms Springer, English deputy faculty leader

Archant

Queens Park Community School has smashed the new national grade proportions set by the government in this year’s GCSE’s, according to head teacher Judith Enright.

EAL pupils at QPCS Elizaveta Vasilyeva, Daniils Kulakovs, Hasan Al-Ali, teacher Judith McNamara, Ana Alves, snf head Judith Enright

EAL pupils at QPCS Elizaveta Vasilyeva, Daniils Kulakovs, Hasan Al-Ali, teacher Judith McNamara, Ana Alves, snf head Judith Enright

The comprehensive school, in Aylestone Avenue, saw 16 pupils achieve a grade 9 grading for English or maths, with two pupils - Zoja Wojcik and Daniel Galvin achieve all three of the new top mark for those three subjects.

The number of students achieving the national proportion of two pc for English was doubled at four pc.

QPCS also smashed the maths target of three pc with six pc of pupils walking away with a 9.

Eighty five per cent of students achieved a grade 4 and above in English while 72pc achieved a grade 4 and above in maths.

Elizaveta Vasileva, 17, and Jolita Simkus, 16 of Queen's Park Community SchoolElizaveta Vasileva, 17, and Jolita Simkus, 16 of Queen's Park Community School

Ms Enright said: “QPCS are thrilled that we have doubled the national proportion of grade 9’s.”

She added: “I am very impressed by the hard work that our students have done, and by the expertise of their teachers who have enabled them to achieve so well.”

She went on to say a large proportion of the successful pupils were part of a reduced GCSE EAL (English Additional Language) group, set up for students arriving in year 10 unable to speak English.

Pupils, who came from global destinations including Latvia, Iraq, Brazil and Sudan, dropped one GSCE but replaced it with extra English lessons, explained EAL co-ordinator Jane McNamara.

Elizaveta Vasileva joined an EAL class when she arrived from St Petersburg, Russia, two years ago.

She said: “I was really shy and afraid of making mistakes, a bit shy to talk in English but they helped me to improve, it was very useful.”

The 17-year-old received a 4 (C) and 5 for English and a 7 (A) for maths. She also bagged an A* for art and a B grade for science.

She said: “I’m planning to go to college to do my favourite course - video game design.”

This year’s GCSE candidates are the first to sit the exams after the changes pushed by former Education Secretary Michael Gove.

Next year the number system will be fully rolled out across all subjects.

However not everybody was impressed. Caio Lira-Behets, 16, said: “Stop adding numbers instead of letters. All it’s done is made smarter people not as smart and made people look dumb when they’re not.”

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