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Carbon monoxide warning after family of 7 hospitalised in Harlesden

PUBLISHED: 17:33 19 January 2016 | UPDATED: 18:08 19 January 2016

A family of seven was taken to hospital after a carbon monoxide leak at their home in High Street Harlesden on January 12 (Pic: Google StreetView)

A family of seven was taken to hospital after a carbon monoxide leak at their home in High Street Harlesden on January 12 (Pic: Google StreetView)

Archant

Emergency services in Brent have warned of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning after a family of seven from Harlesden was hospitalised.

The warning from Brent ambulance crews over carbon monoxide alarms come just days after two adults and five children were taken to hospital after a leak in their home in High Street, Harlesden on January 12.

The occupants were treated on the scene by paramedics before being taken to hospital while fire crews evacuated seven people from adjacent properties and shut off gas supply to the area.

Five days later, Brent ambulance crews were called out to a report of a suspected carbon monoxide leak after a home alarm was triggered.

No one was harmed on this occasion but ambulance crews took to Twitter to highlight the importance of fitting alarms that detect the poisonous gas- also known as “the silent killer”- and ensuring they are working on a regular basis.

London Fire Brigade have warned of the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning (Pic: London Fire Brigade)London Fire Brigade have warned of the symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning (Pic: London Fire Brigade)

The LAS Brent Twitter account posted: “Thankfully the flat had a carbon monoxide alarm so no real harm done! Have you got your alarm? It can save your life.”

Carbon monoxide is a highly poisonous and odourless substance which builds up when appliances fail to burn gas and petrol gas fully and when chimneys and vents become blocked.

More than 50 deaths from carbon monoxide poisoning are recorded every year in the UK.

Advice issued by the London Fire brigade warns carbon monoxide can kill quickly as it is odourless and tasteless but warns that symptoms of poisoning include:

- headaches

- dizziness

- nausea

- breathlessness

- collapse

- loss of consciousness

Alarms should be placed in rooms with fuel burning appliances such as boilers in the kitchen and fires in the lounge and should be tested and replaced regularly.

Residents are also advised to ensure: there is enough ventilation; airbricks are not blocked; chimney flues should be free from blockages; and disposable barbecues should never be used indoors.

For more information see London Fire Brigade’s website.

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