Brent: MP Sarah faces up to junior quiz

SCHOOL students grilled their MP at a Junior Question Time debate to inspire youngsters to get into politics. Students from Cardinal Hinsely School, in Harlesden Road, Harlesden, and Capital City Academy, in Doyle Gardens, Willesden, posed questions about

SCHOOL students grilled their MP at a Junior Question Time debate to inspire youngsters to get into politics.

Students from Cardinal Hinsely School, in Harlesden Road, Harlesden, and Capital City Academy, in Doyle Gardens, Willesden, posed questions about education cuts, bullying, and political campaigning.

The lively debate took place at the Tricycle Theatre, in Kilburn High Road, last Friday.

Sarah Teather, Lib Dem MP for Brent Central and Children's Minister, was on the panel with Dr Rachel Carr and Devina Evanson from IntoUniversity, a national charity, which tackles under achievement in schools.


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One student challenged Ms Teather over the decision to axe the Building Schools for the Future Programme (BSF), announced by education minister Michael Gove at the beginning of the month.

Parents and teachers were devastated when an �80 million project to renovate four Brent schools, including Cardinal Hinsley, were shelved.

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Ms Teather admitted Brent's schools were in dire need of extra funding.

She said: "Copland school is in a terrible state, and Cardinal Hinsley and Queen's Park Community School need extra help.

"But just because BSF stopped doesn't mean that schools will stop

being built."

She said a new scheme to fund school building will be announced shortly, and individual schools will be able to apply for funding to re-build their crumbling classrooms, rather than local authorities bidding on behalf of their schools, as was the case under BSF.

Dr Rachel Carr, who founded

IntoUniversity, said: "Projects like this enable young people to show their thoughtful and creative sides, meet professionals from different careers, and build their confidence.

"The event was a great success."

The debate was the culmination of a series of workshops to inspire

youngsters to think about their future career and broaden their horizons.

Afterwards the students, aged 13 and 14, performed short plays they had written about the impact of bullying on youngsters.

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