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Brent man to trek from Brighton to Scotland towards AI-autism project

PUBLISHED: 09:29 17 September 2020 | UPDATED: 10:29 17 September 2020

Shaheen Mufti and Milo Alexsander (L-R) are set to hike from Brighton to Scotland to help kickstart their work on a smart-device designed to help manage the sensory sensitivities associated with autism.  Picture: Milo Alexsander

Shaheen Mufti and Milo Alexsander (L-R) are set to hike from Brighton to Scotland to help kickstart their work on a smart-device designed to help manage the sensory sensitivities associated with autism. Picture: Milo Alexsander

Archant

A Brent man is hiking from Brighton to Scotland to raise money towards the cost of creating a smart-device to help autistic people with sensory sensitivity.

Shaheen Mufti and his friend Milo Alexsander set off from Brighton Pier on September 15 on the epic journey, which clocks up at around 550 miles over about a month and a half.

The duo work together at Omni Business Solutions, which uses data science and artificial intelligence (AI) to help enterprises grow.

They hope to raise £30,000 towards Ai4Autism, an Omni Business Solutions project to create an AI tool which helps autistic people with sensory sensitivity.

READ MORE: Family of autistic boy from Harlesden inspiring kids to see ’possibility not disability’

Milo explained: “The next step is to fund the cost of obtaining the relevant data on people with autism. Once we have that, we can create an algorithm according to people’s sensitivities, which we will then use to build a smart-device.”

Speaking to the Times on the second day of their hike, sitting on a tree stump in Redhill Common, Shaheen, added: “We have blisters and pain, but it is for a good cause.

“It sometimes takes doing an event like this to get people wanting to support things like Ai4Autism.”

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Milo and Shaheen, who has lived his whole life in Brent, were inspired to launch the project after witnessing the difficulties faced by friends and family with autism.

Shaheen, who wondered if he had undiagnosed autism himself, used to help look after a teenager on the spectrum and hopes the new technology could help quell meltdowns, which would be beneficial for the autistic person and their carers.

He has been boxing five days a week in training, and estimated the duo did around 100 miles of hiking in preparation for the long trip.

Two of their friends, Jaafar Almusaad and Jason Powell, sometimes joined the training.

Milo and Shaheen will probably still be hiking when Milo’s 38th birthday rolls around on October 20, with Shaheen predicting they will reach their goal in early November.

To donate, visit www.gofundme.com/f/hiking4autism-fundraising-for-ai4autism

Follow Shaheen’s and Milo’s hike at www.facebook.com/Ai4Autism-107509757725413, on Twitter @omnibs or on Instagram at

@ai4autism


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