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Where In The World Is Osama Bin Laden (12A)

PUBLISHED: 17:42 29 May 2008 | UPDATED: 13:16 24 August 2010

Where In The World Is Osama Bin Laden (12A) www.whereintheworldmovie.co.uk After tackling fast food in Super Size Me and a variety of social issues in the TV series 30 Days, Morgan Spurlock has set his target on the world s mos

Where In The World Is Osama Bin Laden (12A)

www.whereintheworldmovie.co.uk

After tackling fast food in Super Size Me and a variety of social issues in the TV series 30 Days, Morgan Spurlock has set his target on the world's most wanted man, writes Alex Wellman.

As the figurehead for Al-Quaeda, Osama Bin Laden has had a $25,000,000 price tag on his head since 9/11.

With a baby on the way and terrorism growing across the world year-on-year, Spurlock decides to pack his rucksack and go off in search of Bin Laden to make life safer for his child.

The film begins in the good ole US of A with Spurlock receiving dozens of medicinal jabs to counter any diseases he may pick up on his travels.

Soon after he is in training with a security firm on how to survive in extreme situations.

He dodges into corridors, leaps out of the way of 'grenades,' and receives a blast of pepper spray to the eyes.

After this he is set and goes off to Egypt, Palestine, Israel, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and Pakistan looking for Bin Laden.

Along the way he stops and talks to residents in each country, finding out what they think of America, Islam and Al-Quaeda's top man.

In truth calling Where In The World Is Osama Bin Laden a documentary feels a bit false.

True, it follows writer/director/producer Spurlock as he crosses the Middle East asking people where he can find the infamous tyrant.

But often much of it feels staged.

Scenes where he caresses a picture of his wife seem to have little to do with looking for Bin Laden and more with packing an emotional punch.

The film also suffers from never really scratching the surface.

There are plenty of interviews with a range of people but few who offer much of an insight into the man or his reasons for turning to terror.

Often Spurlock does little more than ask passers-by where they think Bin Laden is rather than getting into more meaty topics.

Having said that, the film is both entertaining and at times eye-opening to a world which is completely alien to most of us in the West.

There is a certain joy in seeing everyday folk from Afghanistan joking with this ginger American about Bin Laden rather than screaming at him like much of the press would have us believe.

Ultimately this is solid entertainment that questions attitudes from the West and Middle East to each other but lacks a firm punch.

alex.wellman@archant.co.uk

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